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GOING HOME — by Antonin Dvorak — Arranged for Solo Ukulele (fingerpicking style) by Ukulele Mike Lynch . . . Included in the Solo Ukulele Instrumentals Fingerpicking collection Enhanced now reduced to just $20

July 14, 2013

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Antonin Leopold Dvorak 1841 – 1904
Dvořák was born in Nelahozeves, near Prague (then part of Bohemia in the Austrian Empire, now Czech Republic), the eldest son of František Dvořák (1814–1894) and his wife Anna, née Zdeňková (1820–1882 800PX-~1 Dvorak birthplace
Dvorak studied music from a very young age and traveled throughout Europe conducting many of his Symphonies, Choral works and many other compositions. In the winter and spring of 1893, Dvořák was commissioned by the New York Philharmonic to write Symphony No.9, “From the New World”, which was premiered under the baton of Anton Seidl. He spent the summer of 1893 with his family in the Czech-speaking community of Spillville, Iowa, to which some of his cousins had earlier immigrated. While there he composed the String Quartet in F (the “American”), and the String Quintet in E flat, as well as a Sonatina for violin and piano. He also conducted a performance of his Eighth Symphony at the Columbian Exposition in Chicago that same year.

The Symphony No. 9 in E minor, From the New World, Op. 95, B. 178 (Czech: Symfonie č. 9 e moll „Z nového světa“), popularly known as the New World Symphony, was composed by Antonín Dvořák in 1893 while he was the director of the National Conservatory of Music of America from 1892 to 1895. It is by far his most popular symphony, and one of the most popular in the romantic repertoire. In older literature and recordings this symphony is often indicated as Symphony No. 5. Neil Armstrong took a recording of the New World Symphony to the Moon during the Apollo 11 mission, the first Moon landing, in 1969.
You Tube performance of the Ukulele Mike arrangement of GOING HOME

The 2nd movement of the 9th Symphony gives us the most beautiful melody known worldwide as GOING HOME. It has been rendered in hymn form and in symphonic as well as solo instrumental arrangements. It is probably among the most celebrated melodies heard throughout the world. I’ve attempted to render it on the ukulele and feel it works quite well. Below is a small clip of the piece in tablature format.

GOING HOME EXAMPLE 1

Going home 1111

In all my ukulele tablature arrangements the 4th and 3rd string are played with the thumb while the 2nd finger plays the 2nd string and the middle finger plays the 1st string. Notice that on the first beat you have 3 notes stacked vertically which indicates a chord. I typically like to roll chords on the ukulele to give it a broader, fuller sound. Thumb plays first then going to the 2nd finger then middle finger.

Below is a clip from the arrangement showing part of the BRIDGE section. Notice the DOUBLE DOTTED line at the beginning of the BRIDGE. The BRIDGE section finishes with another DOUBLE DOTTED line. The DOUBLE DOTTED line indicates a repeat. Unless otherwise notated you repeat the section within the DOUBLE DOTTED lines just once.

GOING HOME EXAMPLE 2

Bridge

GOING HOME is available in tablature format and is included in my SOLO UKULELE INSTRUMENTAL eBook 2013 Enlarged edition. It sells for $20.00 and can be purchased by paying directly through the donate button on the Ukulele Mike website: http://www.ukulelemikelynch

Cover

Table of Contents for the Ukulele Solo Instrumentals eBook:

contents reduced

 

Questions  regarding any ukulele resource, please email: TheUkuleleMan2012@hotmail.com

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One Comment leave one →
  1. May 11, 2016 2:54 p05

    Reblogged this on UKULELE MIKE LYNCH – All things UKULELE and commented:

    Contained in the Fingerpicking ebook Solo Ukulele Instrumentals Vol 1 enhanced edition for $28.95. Purchase through the paypal button on the Ukulele Mike website http://www.ukulelemikelynch.com

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